Thursday, January 28, 2016

Big Bulk Book Sale this Saturday Jan 30th & Sunday Jan 30 & 31st near 4th & Spring In DTLA!


Looking to sell 4,000 - 5,000 books and magazines this weekend at rock bottom prices - with donations to arts and education groups.  Prices as low as one dollar per box of mixed books.

Have lots of art books and magazines and a whole section on marketing and another in graphic design - will sell each section for $20 for several boxes of each. And the same with  books on Hollywood, Also have tons of literature, western novels  (5 HUGE boxes for $25), literary journals , history, travel, film, bios.  Have hundreds and hundreds of art magazines  Call for details.  
BRADY WESTWATER  213-804-8396


Friday, January 22, 2016

Still trying to access my broken computer screen!


I have a broken screen Acer Aspire E-15 with a garbled video image and when I hook it up to a Gateway HD Display Monitor HOMI , the Gateway screen will show exactly was on the Acer screen.  But a half-second later, the words 'Auto Processing - appear over the intact image from the Acer screen - so the connection has been made - but then the screen goes blank. 

And I have tried waiting, fiddling with buttons - but nothing works.  Suggestions?  

Also,  my only other monitor is a Panasonic LCD TC-26cx50 2005 with a Homi/ AVI 983790894 connection other than the standard one. Might that work – and what kind of cable would I need?  Thanks!

Sunday, January 10, 2016

My ACER E 15 computer update just deactivated both my external mouse and my external keyboard

My Aspire E 15 was just made totally unusable by an upgrade I did not ask for and which instantly deactivated both my external mouse and external keyboard. I rebooted my computer a few days ago I was told an update was being installed.

My past history with this computer is it would not stay connected to the wireless in my office and it took me over a month just to download everything not the computer – which are it impossible for me to register the product. And I can only use the computer for typing in my office and have to go elsewhere to use it as a computer

But my new problem started when neither the built-in mouse nor the built in key board even remotely worked. Every sentence I typed was missing at last five or six letters, and trying to use the mouse left with a painfully sore should after just a single day. And tying a single page usually took 15 – 20 minutes it was such a nightmare.

So I bought both an external mouse ad an external keyboard – and they both worked fine. But a few Days ago – after my update – neither the mouse nor the key board would connect. Neither have other keyboards and mice I have tried. And just typing these few words has caused my shoulder…. eye watering pain.

Another change was rather than opening right on my work page – I instead have to sit through a slide show of pictures and then a welcome page pop-ups.

And that had taken me weeks to figure out how to get rid of that crap when I first set-up the computer and first used the first MS word update. And since I assume this is MS crap, it makes me wonder – who did the upgrade.
So how do I REACTIVATE my external mouse an external keyboard? And how can I get rid of the opening pages.

Thanks!

Saturday, January 02, 2016

Big Bulk Book Sale this SUNDAY Jan 3rd near 4th & Spring In DTLA - SECOND UPDATE

SECOND UPDATE!  Have lots of art books and magazines and a whole section on marketing and another in graphic design - will sell each section for $20 for several boxes of each. Also have tons of literature, western novels - probably 4 boxes for $25, literary journals , history, travel, film, bios. Easily 5,000 books - but mainly quite mixed.  So all me at 213--804-8396 and let me know what you're looking for and the more you buy the cheaper they get,

UPDATE!  I have seven large rooms filled wall to wall with boxes of books and magazines that I want to sell tomorrow.  I have four writing projects and these books are one of five non-writing writing projects that have been eating up too much of my time I want to sell all or most of them tomorrow.

I have lost of one of the storage locations for my multiple books collections and am looking to sell everything there this Sunday Jan 3rd between noon and whenever the last box of books is gone.  Noe to limited access to the facility the books will be offered by the box in general categories, though there will be some more specific categories such as a huge Western fiction collection, design books, type, marketing, LA and CA books etc. And the big news is that the highest priced boxes will be priced at no more than 25 cents a book and usually way less - with more hardcovers than soft covers.  Also have tons of really cheap magazines, art, design, horses for any of you collage artists or teachers at charter schools who want to get lots of really good images at really really low prices. And remember, my goal is to sell everything this Sunday.

So more more information or to make an appointment - call me at 213-804-8396.  But not AFTER 7pm Saturday - but anytime after 4 Am this Sunday morning.  Brady Westwater

Monday, November 30, 2015

Why Does Google 'News" Search Have Less and Less - and Older & Older - Actual News?

Once upon a time, I used Google News a lot. Now I almost never do.  I simply go to Twitter when I want to find the latest news.

To give a recent example why - I wanted to see what the weather was like and will be in the Northern part of the California Sierras.  So today on November 30th - I did that search - which I have at the bottom of this page.

And the newest news shown was - November 25th - which was 5 day old weather.  And some of the 'news' stories were as much as 25 days old.  And the over all headline was about Thanksgiving Travel.

The question is - how can Google think that anyone wanting to know what the weather news is now or what the weather will be tomorrow -  should be shown only weather reports/stories that were 5 - 20 days old?

My other issue with Google News is that you used to be able to select time frames for the news you wanted to see - such as in the past hour.  But I have not seen that option in a very long time. 
 
About 32,700 results (0.86 seconds) 

Search Results

Story image for northern california sierras weather from Los Angeles Times

Thanksgiving travelers will face snow-blanketed roadways in ...

Los Angeles Times-Nov 25, 2015
The Sierra Nevada received up to 16 inches of snow on Tuesday. ... If you're headed for Northern California for Thanksgiving, don't get snowed under. ... expected or occurring,” the National Weather Service in Sacramento ...
Winter-like storm brings rain, snow to Northern California
The San Luis Obispo Tribune-Nov 25, 2015
Storm brings snow to Sierra Nevada
OCRegister-Nov 25, 2015
Storm may impact busiest travel day of the year. Here's why
The Weather Network-Nov 25, 2015
Explore in depth (89 more articles)

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

The New Yorker Exposes the Genius of Yuval Sharon, the Industry Opera Company and the Future of Los Angeles


Parts of “Hopscotch” are staged inside a fleet of limousines. 
Other scenes take place on rooftops & in city parks.  Photo by Angie Smith for The New Yorker
More than any other major world city, Los Angeles has been created, built and inspired by individuals. Individuals who came here looking for a dream or came here looking to make a dream come true or who came here expecting to retire and only then realized what they had really wanted to do with their lives.

And then there were those who  just somehow ended up here by good or bad luck  (one early example being captured pirate Joseph Chapman, a Boston Yankee who became LA's most valuable citizen in the 1820's and 1830's) - and then realized they could do things here they couldn't do anyplace else.

And when I first met Yuval Sharon in 2012, I instantly knew he was one of these individuals.  As for who  he is and why you should celebrate his adopting of our city as his home, I'll leave that to the first few paragraphs of Alex Ross's story in the New Yorker - which then continues on the New Yorker's web site.

Opera on Location

A high-tech work of Wagnerian scale is being staged across Los Angeles.

 

Jonah Levy, a thirty-year-old trumpet player based in Los Angeles, has lately developed a curious weekend routine. On Saturday and Sunday mornings, he puts on a white shirt, a black tie, black pants, and a motorcycle jacket, and heads to the ETO Doors warehouse, in downtown L.A. He takes an elevator to the sixth floor and walks up a flight of stairs to the roof, where a disused water tower rises an additional fifty feet. Levy straps his trumpet case to his back and climbs the tower’s spindly, rusty ladder. He wears a safety harness, attaching clamps to the rungs, and uses weight-lifting gloves to avoid cutting his palms.

At the top, he warms up on his piccolo trumpet, applies sunscreen, and takes in views that extend from the skyscrapers of downtown to the San Gabriel Mountains. Just after 11 a.m., he receives a message on a walkie-talkie. “The audience is approaching the elevator,” a voice says. A minute or so later, figures appear on the roof of the Toy Factory Lofts, about a thousand feet away. Levy launches into a four-minute solo: an extended trill, rat-a-tat patterns, eerie bent notes, mournful flourishes in the key of B-flat minor. On the distant side of the lofts, a trombonist answers him. Then Levy sits down in a folding chair and waits a few minutes, until the walkie-talkie crackles again. He performs this solo twenty-four times each day.

Levy is one of a hundred and twenty-six musicians, dancers, and actors participating in “Hopscotch,” a “mobile opera” that is running in L.A. until November 22nd. It is the creation of a company called the Industry, which has drawn notice for presenting experimental opera in unconventional spaces. “Hopscotch” is its most ambitious production, and one of the more complicated operatic enterprises to have been attempted since Richard Wagner staged “The Ring of the Nibelung,” over four days, in 1876. Audience members ride about in a fleet of limousines, witnessing scenes that take place both inside the vehicles and at designated sites. Three simultaneous routes crisscross eastern and downtown L.A. Six principal composers, six librettists, and a production team of nearly a hundred have collaborated on the project, which has a budget of about a million dollars. It is a combination of road trip, architecture tour, contemporary-music festival, and waking dream.

The title “Hopscotch” is borrowed from Julio Cort├ízar’s 1963 magic-realist novel, which invites the reader to navigate the text in nonlinear fashion. The opera’s itineraries also jump around in time, and, because of a system of staggered departure points, each group of limo passengers experiences the work in a different way. Fortunately, the story is simple enough so that you can easily follow what’s happening at any given point. It is a modern fable, with overtones of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice—and with the genders reversed. Lucha, an artist and puppeteer, marries a motorcycle-riding scientist named Jameson, who loses himself in esoteric research and disappears. Lucha hallucinates an encounter with him in the underworld. Unlike Orpheus, she overcomes her grief and finds happiness with Orlando, a fellow-puppeteer. In the Toy Factory Lofts scene, called “Farewell from the Rooftops,” Lucha achieves resolution. Jonah Levy is a fading image of the missing husband, his sombre costume identical to one worn by performers portraying Jameson elsewhere.

“Rooftops,” which has music by Ellen Reid and a text by Mandy Kahn, lasts about ten minutes. Upon arriving at the Toy Factory Lofts, you are greeted by Marja Kay, the singer playing Lucha in the scene, and by a violist. “I set you free, Jameson,” Kay sings, though restless viola patterns indicate lingering tension. (Nineteen women embody Lucha in the course of the opera, each wearing a yellow dress.) By the time you reach the roof, two French-horn players and a violinist have joined the group.

Outside, you experience a thrilling expansion of visual and acoustic space: the ensemble mingles with the ambient rumble of traffic and helicopters. Kay points to the ETO Doors building, and Levy enters the fray, his music suggesting fanfares being pulled apart and blown away by the wind. Kay points in the opposite direction, cueing the trombone. Eventually, she bids farewell to the Jameson figures and descends the elevator in a buoyant mood. “I feel my powers now,” she sings. “This city is orchestral—I lift its baton.”

The phrase is an apt motto for “Hopscotch.” Scenes unfold on the steps of City Hall, in Chinatown Central Plaza, in Evergreen Cemetery, and at the Bradbury Building, the Gilded Age structure whose darkly opulent iron-and-marble atrium appears in “Blade Runner” and many other films. The topography ranges from the verdant summit of Elysian Park to the bleak concrete channel of the Los Angeles River.

 

And there is much, much more at THE NEW YORKER

Wednesday, November 04, 2015

ANOTHER Rave Review for CARRIE, The Musical by Los Angeles Magazine - TWO MORE WEEKS at the Historic 1931 Los Angeles Theatre in DTLA


Emily Lopez as Carrie White in Carrie: The Musical
Photograph by Jason Niedle

Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre 

Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre

Carrie: The Musical is playing for two more weeks at a gorgeous old theater on Broadway and you should go see it. Here’s hoping that the November dates will give the show a chance to be heard beyond all the Halloween hubbub. Yes, it’s based on a Stephen King novel and (spoiler alert) everyone dies at the end, but the play is much bigger than all that.
The spectacular staging literally transforms the Los Angeles Theatre, the finest of all the downtown movie palaces, by inserting a new theater inside the vintage auditorium. The action takes place inside a steel cube reached by ramps that cantilever out over the original 1931 seating. Peering over the edge down to the ancient loge section listening to the piped-in sounds of water dripping in the dramatic darkness I couldn’t help but think of Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams. The baroque hall that opened with Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights is just a hulking, dreamy background that engulfs the set, built to resemble a high school gym. The faces of cherubs look down on audience members seated on benches that cast members roll around the stage.
When I heard that legendary Disney imagineer Bob Gurr saw the show I asked him what he thought of the unusual seating. “What better, and original, way to not just witness a theater presentation, but move around the stage on a bleacher ride which changes scenes,” Gurr said. “Actually powered by the cast themselves as part of their acting. Now there's a fabulous way to be thoroughly immersed in the story.”
My memory of the Sissy Spacek movie is dim, and I never saw the 1988 musical, but this production seems to be less abusive religious fanaticism and more feel-good anti-bullying hero’s journey.  Carrie White's makeover montage is so cheerful it feels almost like parody. In a cast of strong powerful singers, Jon Robert Hall, Jenelle Lynn Randall, and Misty Cotton, as Carrie’s mother, were exceptional.
My guest had issues with things like story and character development, but I was simply dazzled by all the stagecraft. Jesus Christ literally flies off the cross and into the audience. Now, that's showbiz!
Carrie is a big impressive show stuffed with singing and dancing and telekinesis. It’s all covered with baubles and it's the perfect thing to lure folks away from their Netflix. I hope it works.
- See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpuf

Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre

Carrie: The Musical is playing for two more weeks at a gorgeous old theater on Broadway and you should go see it. Here’s hoping that the November dates will give the show a chance to be heard beyond all the Halloween hubbub. Yes, it’s based on a Stephen King novel and (spoiler alert) everyone dies at the end, but the play is much bigger than all that.
The spectacular staging literally transforms the Los Angeles Theatre, the finest of all the downtown movie palaces, by inserting a new theater inside the vintage auditorium. The action takes place inside a steel cube reached by ramps that cantilever out over the original 1931 seating. Peering over the edge down to the ancient loge section listening to the piped-in sounds of water dripping in the dramatic darkness I couldn’t help but think of Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams. The baroque hall that opened with Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights is just a hulking, dreamy background that engulfs the set, built to resemble a high school gym. The faces of cherubs look down on audience members seated on benches that cast members roll around the stage.
When I heard that legendary Disney imagineer Bob Gurr saw the show I asked him what he thought of the unusual seating. “What better, and original, way to not just witness a theater presentation, but move around the stage on a bleacher ride which changes scenes,” Gurr said. “Actually powered by the cast themselves as part of their acting. Now there's a fabulous way to be thoroughly immersed in the story.”
My memory of the Sissy Spacek movie is dim, and I never saw the 1988 musical, but this production seems to be less abusive religious fanaticism and more feel-good anti-bullying hero’s journey.  Carrie White's makeover montage is so cheerful it feels almost like parody. In a cast of strong powerful singers, Jon Robert Hall, Jenelle Lynn Randall, and Misty Cotton, as Carrie’s mother, were exceptional.
My guest had issues with things like story and character development, but I was simply dazzled by all the stagecraft. Jesus Christ literally flies off the cross and into the audience. Now, that's showbiz!
Carrie is a big impressive show stuffed with singing and dancing and telekinesis. It’s all covered with baubles and it's the perfect thing to lure folks away from their Netflix. I hope it works.
- See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpuf
Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre - See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpuf
CHRIS NICHOLS


Carrie: The Musical is playing for two more weeks at a gorgeous old theater on Broadway and you should go see it. Here’s hoping that the November dates will give the show a chance to be heard beyond all the Halloween hubbub. Yes, it’s based on a Stephen King novel and (spoiler alert) everyone dies at the end, but the play is much bigger than all that.
The spectacular staging literally transforms the entire Los Angeles Theatre, the finest of all the downtown movie palaces, by inserting a new theater inside the vintage auditorium. The action takes place inside a steel cube reached by ramps that cantilever out over the original 1931 seating. Peering over the edge down to the ancient loge section listening to the piped-in sounds of water dripping in the dramatic darkness I couldn’t help but think of Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams. The baroque fall opened baroque with Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights is just a hulking, dreamy background that engulfs the set, built to resemble a high school gym. The faces of cherubs look down on audience members seated on benches that cast members roll around the stage.
When I heard that Bob Gurr, the legendary Disney imagineer, saw the show I asked him what he thought of the unusual seating. “What better, and original, way to not just witness a theater presentation, but move around the stage on a bleacher ride which changes scenes,” Gurr said. “Actually powered by the cast themselves as part of their acting. Now there's a fabulous way to be thoroughly immersed in the story.”
My memory of the movie is dim, and this production seems to be less abusive religious fanaticism and more feel-good anti-bullying hero’s journey.  Carrie White's makeover montage is so cheerful it feels almost like parody. In a cast of strong powerful singers, Jon Robert Hall, Jenelle Lynn Randall, and Misty Cotton, as Carrie’s mother, were exceptional.
My guest had issues with things like story and character development, but I was simply dazzled by all the stagecraft. Jesus Christ literally flies off the cross and into the audience. Now, that's showbiz!
Carrie is a big impressive show stuffed with singing and dancing and telekinesis. It’s all covered with baubles and it's the perfect thing to lure folks away from their Netflix. I hope it works.








Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre - See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpufCarrie: The Musical is playing for two more weeks at a gorgeous old theater on Broadway and you should go see it. Here’s hoping that the November dates will give the show a chance to be heard beyond all the Halloween hubbub. Yes, it’s based on a Stephen King novel and (spoiler alert) everyone dies at the end, but the play is much bigger than all thatThe spectacular staging literally transforms the Los Angeles Theatre, the finest of all the downtown movie palaces, by inserting a new theater inside the vintage auditorium. The action takes place inside a steel cube reached by ramps that cantilever out over the original 1931 seating. Peering over the edge down to the ancient loge section listening to the piped-in sounds of water dripping in the dramatic darkness I couldn’t help but think of Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams. The baroque hall that opened with Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights is just a hulking, dreamy background that engulfs the set, built to resemble a high school gym. The faces of cherubs look down on audience members seated on benches that cast members roll around the stageWhen I heard that legendary Disney imagineer Bob Gurr saw the show I asked him what he thought of the unusual seating. “What better, and original, way to not just witness a theater presentation, but move around the stage on a bleacher ride which changes scenes,” Gurr said. “Actually powered by the cast themselves as part of their acting. Now there's a fabulous way to be thoroughly immersed in the story.”

Carrie: The Musical is playing for two more weeks at a gorgeous old theater on Broadway and you should go see it. Here’s hoping that the November dates will give the show a chance to be heard beyond all the Halloween hubbub. Yes, it’s based on a Stephen King novel and (spoiler alert) everyone dies at the end, but the play is much bigger than all that.
The spectacular staging literally transforms the Los Angeles Theatre, the finest of all the downtown movie palaces, by inserting a new theater inside the vintage auditorium. The action takes place inside a steel cube reached by ramps that cantilever out over the original 1931 seating. Peering over the edge down to the ancient loge section listening to the piped-in sounds of water dripping in the dramatic darkness I couldn’t help but think of Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams. The baroque hall that opened with Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights is just a hulking, dreamy background that engulfs the set, built to resemble a high school gym. The faces of cherubs look down on audience members seated on benches that cast members roll around the stage.
When I heard that legendary Disney imagineer Bob Gurr saw the show I asked him what he thought of the unusual seating. “What better, and original, way to not just witness a theater presentation, but move around the stage on a bleacher ride which changes scenes,” Gurr said. “Actually powered by the cast themselves as part of their acting. Now there's a fabulous way to be thoroughly immersed in the story.”
My memory of the Sissy Spacek movie is dim, and I never saw the 1988 musical, but this production seems to be less abusive religious fanaticism and more feel-good anti-bullying hero’s journey.  Carrie White's makeover montage is so cheerful it feels almost like parody. In a cast of strong powerful singers, Jon Robert Hall, Jenelle Lynn Randall, and Misty Cotton, as Carrie’s mother, were exceptional.
My guest had issues with things like story and character development, but I was simply dazzled by all the stagecraft. Jesus Christ literally flies off the cross and into the audience. Now, that's showbiz!
Carrie is a big impressive show stuffed with singing and dancing and telekinesis. It’s all covered with baubles and it's the perfect thing to lure folks away from their Netflix. I hope it works.
- See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpuf
Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre - See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpuf

Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre

Carrie: The Musical is playing for two more weeks at a gorgeous old theater on Broadway and you should go see it. Here’s hoping that the November dates will give the show a chance to be heard beyond all the Halloween hubbub. Yes, it’s based on a Stephen King novel and (spoiler alert) everyone dies at the end, but the play is much bigger than all that.
The spectacular staging literally transforms the Los Angeles Theatre, the finest of all the downtown movie palaces, by inserting a new theater inside the vintage auditorium. The action takes place inside a steel cube reached by ramps that cantilever out over the original 1931 seating. Peering over the edge down to the ancient loge section listening to the piped-in sounds of water dripping in the dramatic darkness I couldn’t help but think of Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams. The baroque hall that opened with Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights is just a hulking, dreamy background that engulfs the set, built to resemble a high school gym. The faces of cherubs look down on audience members seated on benches that cast members roll around the stage.
When I heard that legendary Disney imagineer Bob Gurr saw the show I asked him what he thought of the unusual seating. “What better, and original, way to not just witness a theater presentation, but move around the stage on a bleacher ride which changes scenes,” Gurr said. “Actually powered by the cast themselves as part of their acting. Now there's a fabulous way to be thoroughly immersed in the story.”
My memory of the Sissy Spacek movie is dim, and I never saw the 1988 musical, but this production seems to be less abusive religious fanaticism and more feel-good anti-bullying hero’s journey.  Carrie White's makeover montage is so cheerful it feels almost like parody. In a cast of strong powerful singers, Jon Robert Hall, Jenelle Lynn Randall, and Misty Cotton, as Carrie’s mother, were exceptional.
My guest had issues with things like story and character development, but I was simply dazzled by all the stagecraft. Jesus Christ literally flies off the cross and into the audience. Now, that's showbiz!
Carrie is a big impressive show stuffed with singing and dancing and telekinesis. It’s all covered with baubles and it's the perfect thing to lure folks away from their Netflix. I hope it works.
- See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpuf

Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre

Carrie: The Musical is playing for two more weeks at a gorgeous old theater on Broadway and you should go see it. Here’s hoping that the November dates will give the show a chance to be heard beyond all the Halloween hubbub. Yes, it’s based on a Stephen King novel and (spoiler alert) everyone dies at the end, but the play is much bigger than all that.
The spectacular staging literally transforms the Los Angeles Theatre, the finest of all the downtown movie palaces, by inserting a new theater inside the vintage auditorium. The action takes place inside a steel cube reached by ramps that cantilever out over the original 1931 seating. Peering over the edge down to the ancient loge section listening to the piped-in sounds of water dripping in the dramatic darkness I couldn’t help but think of Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams. The baroque hall that opened with Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights is just a hulking, dreamy background that engulfs the set, built to resemble a high school gym. The faces of cherubs look down on audience members seated on benches that cast members roll around the stage.
When I heard that legendary Disney imagineer Bob Gurr saw the show I asked him what he thought of the unusual seating. “What better, and original, way to not just witness a theater presentation, but move around the stage on a bleacher ride which changes scenes,” Gurr said. “Actually powered by the cast themselves as part of their acting. Now there's a fabulous way to be thoroughly immersed in the story.”
My memory of the Sissy Spacek movie is dim, and I never saw the 1988 musical, but this production seems to be less abusive religious fanaticism and more feel-good anti-bullying hero’s journey.  Carrie White's makeover montage is so cheerful it feels almost like parody. In a cast of strong powerful singers, Jon Robert Hall, Jenelle Lynn Randall, and Misty Cotton, as Carrie’s mother, were exceptional.
My guest had issues with things like story and character development, but I was simply dazzled by all the stagecraft. Jesus Christ literally flies off the cross and into the audience. Now, that's showbiz!
Carrie is a big impressive show stuffed with singing and dancing and telekinesis. It’s all covered with baubles and it's the perfect thing to lure folks away from their Netflix. I hope it works.
- See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpuf

Carrie: The Musical Transforms Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre

Carrie: The Musical is playing for two more weeks at a gorgeous old theater on Broadway and you should go see it. Here’s hoping that the November dates will give the show a chance to be heard beyond all the Halloween hubbub. Yes, it’s based on a Stephen King novel and (spoiler alert) everyone dies at the end, but the play is much bigger than all that.
The spectacular staging literally transforms the Los Angeles Theatre, the finest of all the downtown movie palaces, by inserting a new theater inside the vintage auditorium. The action takes place inside a steel cube reached by ramps that cantilever out over the original 1931 seating. Peering over the edge down to the ancient loge section listening to the piped-in sounds of water dripping in the dramatic darkness I couldn’t help but think of Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams. The baroque hall that opened with Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights is just a hulking, dreamy background that engulfs the set, built to resemble a high school gym. The faces of cherubs look down on audience members seated on benches that cast members roll around the stage.
When I heard that legendary Disney imagineer Bob Gurr saw the show I asked him what he thought of the unusual seating. “What better, and original, way to not just witness a theater presentation, but move around the stage on a bleacher ride which changes scenes,” Gurr said. “Actually powered by the cast themselves as part of their acting. Now there's a fabulous way to be thoroughly immersed in the story.”
My memory of the Sissy Spacek movie is dim, and I never saw the 1988 musical, but this production seems to be less abusive religious fanaticism and more feel-good anti-bullying hero’s journey.  Carrie White's makeover montage is so cheerful it feels almost like parody. In a cast of strong powerful singers, Jon Robert Hall, Jenelle Lynn Randall, and Misty Cotton, as Carrie’s mother, were exceptional.
My guest had issues with things like story and character development, but I was simply dazzled by all the stagecraft. Jesus Christ literally flies off the cross and into the audience. Now, that's showbiz!
Carrie is a big impressive show stuffed with singing and dancing and telekinesis. It’s all covered with baubles and it's the perfect thing to lure folks away from their Netflix. I hope it works.
- See more at: http://www.lamag.com/askchris/carrie-the-musical-transforms-the-los-angeles-theatre/#sthash.9UvnKRIb.dpuf